Current Campaigns

 

END TEMPORARY PROTECTION NOW

Unnamed “senior sources” have told media the Albanese government will announce permanence for 19,000 refugees living with temporary visas soon.

While a welcome relief for some, we hold grave concerns that 12,000 people who’ve been part of our communities for a decade will be left in fear of being torn from their homes and forced to danger.

Please email Prime Minister Anthony Albanese now.

Let Mr Albanese know that all 31,000 people subjected to Mr Morrison’s unfair “fast track” system need a pathway to permanence now.

As of 30 November 2022, there were 92 people on Nauru. As of 31 December 2021 (when the arrangement with PNG ended), there were 105 people in PNG. The Department no longer publishes data on the numbers left in PNG.

Most of those still in PNG now live in Port Moresby.

Operation #NotForgotten was developed in 2019 as a community-led response to provide private sponsorship to Canada for refugees who have been caught in Australia’s offshore processing regime and are stuck in Papua New Guinea, Nauru or in detention in Australia and have been left with no viable resettlement options, having been excluded from Australia’s resettlement deal with the United States. 

To find out more: Operation Not Forgotten

 

FIND DURABLE SOLUTIONS FOR PEOPLE SUBJECT TO OFFSHORE DETENTION

As of 30 November 2022, there were 92 people on Nauru. As of 31 December 2021 (when the arrangement with PNG ended), there were 105 people in PNG. The Department no longer publishes data on the numbers left in PNG. Refugee Council figures

Operation #NotForgotten was developed in 2019 as a community-led response to provide private sponsorship to Canada for refugees who have been caught in Australia’s offshore processing regime and are stuck in Papua New Guinea, Nauru or in detention in Australia and have been left with no viable resettlement options, having been excluded from Australia’s resettlement deal with the United States.  To find out more:   Operation Not Forgotten

 

EXPAND THE HUMANITARIAN PROGRAM

In 2020, the previous Australian Government cut 5,000 places from Australia’s Refugee and Humanitarian Program – bringing Australia’s official intake to just 13,750 places annually. This is one of the lowest levels in 45 years, during a time when the need for resettlement has never been greater.

In contrast, countries such as the United States are committing to resettling 125,000 refugees every year.

Before the election, the Albanese Government committed to increasing the Refugee and Humanitarian Program to 27,000 places annually, as well as making an additional 5000 places available through the Community Sponsorship Program. This is welcomed, but Australia can do so much more.

The new Albanese Government must increase the annual Refugee and Humanitarian Program to at least 30,000 places – prioritising people selected by the United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees.

Read more and Take Action.

 

EXTEND FINANCIAL SUPPORT TO PEOPLE SEEKING ASYLUM

92% of Australians agree that, “In Australia, no one should go without basic essentials like food, healthcare, transport and power.”*

And yet, for many people seeking asylum, getting essentials like these is difficult. Many people rely on charities to provide week-to-week support to prevent them becoming homeless or going without food.

Many of the people we visit receive no government support and their work opportunities are often limited to casual, poorly paid employment. Consequently, the financial demands on BMRSG have increased.

The refugee agencies are highlighting the need for an income safety net for people who seek protection in our country and then find themselves with nothing to fall back on.

 

Afghanistan: Taliban Repression, Hunger Increases

Women’s Rights Drastically Curtailed; Mounting Islamic State Atrocities

Human Rights Watch

January 12, 2023

Taliban authorities, since taking power in August 2021, have broadly imposed rules and policies that deny women and girls their basic rights and crush peaceful dissent, Human Rights Watch said today in its World Report 2023. The Taliban’s blanket disregard for rights has contributed to their global isolation even as Afghanistan’s economic and humanitarian crisis worsened.

In March 2022, the Taliban backtracked on a pledge to reopen girls’ secondary schools, the vast majority of which were closed after the Taliban takeover. They closed universities to women and girls in December. Taliban security forces violently dispersed women’s protests, detaining a number of protesters. The authorities also announced rules requiring women, including TV newscasters, to cover their faces in public and stipulating that male family members would be punished if women violated rules for their movements and dress.   Read more